Vietnamese Corn Pudding

There's a video tutorial at the end of this post. Corn pudding_Vietnamese cuisine_Vietnamese food blog_Vietnamese food recipe-3 Corn pudding_Vietnamese cuisine_Vietnamese food blog_Vietnamese food recipe-4 Finally we decided to get an oven last week. Ovens aren't typically something found in Vietnamese homes because electricity can be expensive for the average Vietnamese family and the addition of a heat source in the house during hot months is a pretty foreign idea! However things are changing and Vietnamese are falling in love with baking. After baking our first loaf of bread (and eating it all down it soon after that), we wondered why we hadn't bought it earlier. I've tried so many delicious recipes with it and my husband has been baking bread (and cookies!) nonstop. I'm wondering if I should photograph and write a blog post of him baking banana bread. Well, why not. He's a super cute baker and the bread is super delicious! The one thing that I haven't tried with an oven is baking cakes. It's because, being a Vietnamese I didn't grow up with cakes and so I haven't fallen in love with them yet. Usually in Vietnam we just eat fruit for dessert or the traditional dessert chè. Corn pudding_Vietnamese cuisine_Vietnamese food blog_Vietnamese food recipe-2 Hoi An is famous in Vietnam for its corn chè (chè bắp in Vietnamese). Chè is a good example of how some Asian cultures like to use vegetables or beans in a sweet base as a dessert. I used to bike to a chè lady's place in the old town once a week to eat her chè bắp. However, recently street vendors in Hoi An Old Town have been moved to a different area. And they have to run every time some security people come to shoo them out of the way. It's unfortunate because my favorite vendor is the third generation plying this craft and is having a hard time keeping her clientele. Corn pudding_Vietnamese cuisine_Vietnamese food blog_Vietnamese food recipe So in honor of Hoi An's chè tradition, today I made corn chè at home. This can be eaten warm in the winter or cold in the summer, tasty either way! Many people like to eat it with coconut milk sauce, but I prefer to eat mine plain. I'm not sure if this dish will appeal to Western tastes but I'm sharing it here as it's a good example of one aspect of our food culture. Watch the video below to see how to make it for yourself. Chúc ngon miệng!

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